I appreciate those of you have taken the time to read and those who have taken the time to read and comment. You have helped me (re)think and sharpen ideas and given me much for further consideration. I was asked at one point what my goals were. For me, that goes to purpose.

First, I suppose, is a sense of entitlement. 25 years, well over 10,000, has, I think, given me the credibility to say some things about teaching and education. And I want to say them in a way that promotes conversation. I envision having sidebars from former students and colleagues, other professionals – especially those who disagree with me or remember things differently.

I want to tell my story. There are so many stories out there about what teachers are like, what teaching is like. I am not at all claiming that mine is representative in any way; it’s just mine. In fact, given my wide range of experience (never the plan), I think it’s pretty unique. I’ve also been asked how and why I’ve stayed in teaching for so long. So maybe that’s the story. I think maybe it’s the gaps I want to fill or at least address between what I see presented to the public and what happens down on the ground level.

I’ve also been asked how and why I’ve stayed in teaching for so long. So maybe that’s the story. I think maybe it’s the gaps I want to fill or at least address between what I see presented to the public and what happens down on the ground level.

I’d also like to think I could have an impact. I hope my readers are new teachers or teacher-leaders or people just starting schools and that my experience gives them some things to consider and maybe even inspires each reader a bit. I hope the book is one that is useful. I expect it to be annotated, passed around.

If you go to the Education section of a library or bookstore (often located near the Parenting section – an interesting choice), you will see, I imagine three kinds of education books. There are the practical, instructional ones – the mammoth study guides for various tests, for example. And vocabulary workbooks. And for teachers, there are books on how to teach writing. Or with poverty in mind. There are those who want to present their big ideas or comment on the big ideas of others. But how many do you find that are written by teachers who are still teaching (somewhere in the PK-12 range)? Of course, time is an issue. Some weeks it can be hard to write an email, let alone a chapter, for example. The only one I can think of right now is This Is Not a Test, which is, by the way, quite good. Feel free to mention more when you comment. I’m sure I am not thinking of some good ones. So I think that’s another gap I want to fill. Or at least try to fill.

Never the Plan – that could make for an interesting title. . .

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